Cradle To Crank It Up, Looking For More Hard Tech Startups

Published 25 November, 2019

Cradle Startup Awards recipients (L to R) Calvin Yeap, Head of Marketing, iPay88 (M) Sdn Bhd, Chelsea Chee, cofounder/CEO of MAEKO, Ng Wing Loon, COO, Involve Asia Sdn Bhd, Christy Ng, founder/CEO, Christy Ng, Razif Abdul Aziz, Acting Group CEO, Cradle Fund, Dr Mohd Nor Azman, Deputy Sec-Gen (Science Technology & Innovation) of MESTECC, Muhamad Nasir Habizar, JomParking Sdn Bhd founder/CEO, ST Chua, director, Sunway iLabs, Stephanie Ping, cofounder/CEO, WORQ and Fong Wai Hong, cofounder/CEO, Storehub Sdn Bhd.

After a tough 17-months, in which Cradle Fund Sdn Bhd (Cradle) lost, not only its outstanding CEO, Nazrin Hassan in a tragic incident in June 2018 but also was in a state of flux over its own future, with a new government relooking the structure and relevance of various development agencies, Cradle just wanted to end 2019 on a high and energetic note.

 

And what better way, it thought, than to organize its inaugural Cradle Startup Awards & Media Appreciation Night. The idea is to celebrate 16 years of empowering Malaysian startups and to recognise the contributions of Cradle supported startups and partners in cultivating a vibrant ecosystem and putting Malaysia on the global map. Even the media was recognized for its role in highlighting the various Cradle ecosystem initiatives and their impact.

 

And ironically the first media coverage of the event from the Malaysian national news agency Bernama, published while the function was still going on, Thursday night, caused a kerfuffle among Cradle staff and likely spiked the blood pressure of Razif Abdul Aziz, Cradle’s Acting Group CEO. In an era where online media regularly use sharp and spicy headlines to draw readers in, the headline screaming that Razif felt the majority of startup ideas were not worth being funded by taxpayers, proved too raw for an organization and its leader, coming out of an emotionally rough 17-month stretch.

 

Fearing negative public reaction, Razif took immediate action, not by calling for a press conference to clarify his remarks (that’s so pre-social media era), but rather by taking to social media to explain that while the headline was strictly speaking accurate, the way it was worded did not paint an accurate picture. Words matter. He viewed the lack of fundable ideas as a matter of concern over the lack of creativity and innovation displayed, explained Razif. Clearly he did not want the public to misinterpret the headline as him being harsh and cold.

 

Source From Digital News Asia